Cost of Emigration Clearance Certificate (ECC)

Cost of an ECC Emigration Clearance Certificate or Exit Clearance Certificate

The cost for an ECC-A, checked at immigration.gov.ph on 29 May 2020, is either 710 or 1,210 pesos depending on age.

Under 14 years of age:
Php
ECC 200.00
LRF 10.00
Express Lane Fee 500.00
TOTAL Php 710.00

Adult:
Php
ECC 700.00
LRF 10.00
Express Lane Fee 500.00
TOTAL Php 1,210.00

Is it Cheaper to Overstay a Philippine Visa or Pay for a Visa Extension?

Is it cheaper to overstay a visa rather than pay for the visa extension?

I was asked this question recently, as it appears that many people seem to think that the overstay fines are cheaper than paying for a Visa renewal.

Having heard this a few times, I am beginning to think that this might be the reason why so many foreign visitors to the Philippines end up not renewing a visa, and overstaying for so long.

At least some of them think the fine is cheaper than a visa, and don’t bother renewing their entry visa, expecting to just pay the fine when they leave.

Unfortunately for them, they eventually find out that while the fine is cheaper than a Visa, it is not as simple as that.

  • A Two Month Visitor visa will cost about 6,650 pesos. Consisting of 3,650 php + about another 3,000 (depending on USD-PHP FX rate) pesos for the ACR-I card (according to www.immigration.gov.ph).
  • The Fine for overstaying for just under two months is 1,500 pesos. (Consisting of 1,000 pesos [Fine for Overstaying 2 months] + 500 pesos [Motion for Reconsideration for Overstaying]).

For some people, they see those two figures and think that it is best to pay the 1,500 pesos.

But the reality is VERY DIFFERENT to that:

What you actually pay is:

  • The Fine PLUS outstanding unpaid visa fees; ie: 1,500 plus 6,650 in the above example, a total of 8,150 pesos.
  • PLUS, depending on how long you overstayed, you may be banned from re-entry.

It is often best to know the full facts.

Some people, who have overstayed, and expect to pay the fine at the airport, and then leave, actually end up paying an even higher price…

  • You don’t pay the fine at the airport, you are normally refused boarding, and told to go to an immigration office, normally in the nearest city, and sort out your visa issues there, and come back later, often the next day, or later.

This comes with TWO costs.

  1. Inconvenience to you, and the cost of an extra night or two at a hotel, while they sort out the visa issues, and arrange an exit certificate if applicable.
  2. The cost of new flights, unless your ticket was fully convertible to a new flight. Most are not.

I was told that the hotel costs are not always involved, as a stay at the Bureau of Immigration Bicutan Detention Centre can be an option, for Immigration to decide.  I personally do not know anyone who was jailed, but I have heard people talking about other people who were.  I have also read about some who were, although not 100% sure on the full story of each case.

and more….

Philippine Star News Article on November 27, 2016

www.philstar.com/…/bi-eyes-building-more-jail-cells-overstaying-foreigners

MANILA, Philippines – Bureau of Immigration (BI) Commissioner Jaime Morente wants to construct another building for its jail at Camp Bagong Diwa (Bicutan Detention Centre) prior to cracking down on around 500,000 foreigners illegally staying in the country.

“We want to conduct nationwide operations but the problem is we do not have (enough cells) to house those who would be arrested for overstaying,” he said in a recent interview.

Morente said the bureau’s jail, a “squatter” in the National Capital Region Police Office compound at the camp, has two two-story buildings.  Morente wants to construct a third two-story building.

My view is that detention for a small overstay is very unlikely, although it is legally possible, if they don’t like you for some reason.

Another story:

The Bureau of Immigration (BI) on Thursday (March 30, 2019) reported the arrest of an overstaying Vietnamese couple for attempting to leave the country with fake immigration stamps on their passports. The couple had been in the country since June 5, 2018 (10 months).

Instead of applying for the extension of their stay and pay the required fees, they chose to deal with fixers who make a living by selling these fake stamps to overstaying foreign tourists,” he said.

The BI official noted that the fraudulent scheme was discovered after their personnel noticed that the passports did not have departure stamps from the foreign nationals supposed previous arrival.

They are currently detained at the BI detention facility in Camp Bagong Diwa, Taguig City pending their prosecution for violating the Philippine Immigration Act. (pna.gov.ph)

Story Link:

How much are the Penalties for Overstaying as a Tourist in the Philippines?

No-Visa Entry for 30 Day Stay Privilege under EO 408

30 Day Visa Free Stay under EO 408

Under Executive Order 408 dated 9 November 2014, as amended, nationals of the following countries may enter the Philippines without a visa for a stay not exceeding thirty (30) days provided that they are holders of a passport valid at least six (6) months beyond the period of stay in the Philippines, and possess return or outward bound tickets to their country of origin or next country of destination.

Last Updated: 14 February 2017

1. Andorra
2. Angola
3. Antigua and Barbuda
4. Argentina
5. Australia
6. Austria
7. Bahamas
8. Bahrain
9. Barbados
10. Belgium
11. Belize
12. Benin
13. Bhutan
14. Bolivia
15. Botswana
16. Brazil*
17. Brunei
18. Bulgaria
19. Burkina Faso
20. Burundi
21. Cambodia
22. Cameroon
23. Canada
24. Cape Verde
25. Central African Republic
26. Chad
27. Chile
28. Colombia
29. Comoros
30. Congo
31. Congo, Democratic Republic
32. Costa Rica
33. Cote d’ Ivoire
34. Croatia
35. Cyprus
36. Czech Republic
37. Denmark
38. Djibouti
39. Dominica
40. Dominican Republic
41. Ecuador
42. El Salvador
41. Equatorial Guinea
44. Eritrea
45. Estonia
46. Ethiopia
47. Fiji
48. Finland
49. France
50. Gabon
51. Gambia
52. Germany
53. Ghana
54. Greece
55. Grenada
56. Guatemala
57. Guinea
58. Guinea·Bissau
59. Guyana
60. Haiti
61. Honduras
62. Hungary
63. Iceland
64. Indonesia
65. Ireland
66. Israel*
67. Italy
68. Jamaica
69. Japan
70. Kazakhstan
71. Kenya .
72. Kiribati
73. Korea (ROK)
74. Kuwait
75. Kyrgyzstan
76. Laos
77. Latvia
78. Lesotho
79. Liberia
80. Liechtenstein
81. Lithuania
82. Luxembourg
83. Madagascar
84. Malawi
85. Malaysia
86. Maldives
87. Mali
88. Malta
85. Marshall Islands
90. Mauritania
91. Mauritius
92. Mexico
93. Micronesia
94. Monaco
95. Mongolia
96. Morocco
97. Mozambique
98. Myanmar
99. Namibia
100. Nepal
101. Netherlands
102. New Zealand
103. Nicaragua
104. Niger
105. Norway
106. Oman
107. Palau
108. Panama
109. Papua New Guinea
110. Paraguay
111. Peru
112. Poland
113. Portugal
114. Qatar
115. Romania
116. Russia
117. Rwanda
118. St. Kitts and Nevis
119. Saint Lucia
120. St. Vincent and the Grenadines
121. Samoa
122. San Marino
123. Sao Tome and Principe
124. Saudi Arabia
125. Senegal
126. Seychelles
127. Singapore
128. Slovak Republic
129. Slovenia
130. Solomon Islands
131.South Africa
132. Spain
133. Suriname
134. Swaziland
135. Sweden
136. Switzerland
137. Tajikistan
138. Tanzania
139. Thailand
140. Togo
141. Trinidad and Tobago
142. Tunisia
143. Turkey
144. Turkmenistan
145. Tuvalu
146 .Uganda
147. United Arab Emirates
148. United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland
149. United States of America
150. Uruguay
151. Uzbekistan
152. Vanuatu
153. Vatican
154. Venezuela
155. Vietnam
156. Zambia
157. Zimbabwe*Brazil and Israel remain eligible for 59-day visa-free entry as elaborated under Section D of FSC-21·10.

The following are allowed to enter the Philippines without a visa for a stay not exceeding fifty-nine (59) days:

  1. Holders of Brazil passports; and
  2. Holders of Israel passports

The following are allowed to enter the Philippines without a visa for a stay not exceeding fourteen (14) days

  1. Holders of Macau SAR passports
  2. Holders of Hongkong SAR passports
  3. Indian nationals coming for tourism or business with valid Australian, Japanese, American, Canadian, Schengen, Singaporean and UK visas or permanent residence permit (admission is implemented only at NAIA I, II, III and IV)

The following are allowed to enter the Philippines without a visa for a stay not exceeding seven (7) days

  1. Holders of British National Overseas (BNO) passports
  2. Holders of Macau-Portuguese and Hongkong British passports
  3. Chinese nationals from mainland China coming for tourism purposes with valid Australian, Japanese, Canadian, Schengen or US visa

Important Note:
Nationals who are subjects of deportation/blacklist orders of the Department and the Bureau of Immigration (BI) shall not be admitted to the Philippines.

Source: dfa.gov.ph/no-visa-entry-for-30-day-stay-under-e-o-408

Conversion from Philippines Visitor Visa to a Student Visa

Changing from Visitor Visa to a Philippines Student Visa

Foreign nationals, in the Philippines on a Visitor Visa, who are at least 18 years old and intending to take up a course of study higher than high school at a University, seminary or college, can apply for a Student Visa at a Philippines Bureau of Immigration Office.

The process and cost is shown at: immigration.gov.ph/…/conversion-to-student-visa

The cost shown at that page on the 24th July 2018 was:

Application Fee: PHP 2,000
Implementation Fee: PHP 1,000
Service Fee: PHP 1,000
Certificate Fee: PHP 500
Visa Fee: PHP 1,000
ICR, CRTV, CRTS, CRTT, CRPE: PHP 1,400
Legal Research Fee (LRF) for each immigration fee except Head Tax and Fines: PHP 70
Alien Certificate of Registration (ACR): PHP 1,000
Head Tax: PHP 250
Express Fee (Certification): PHP 500
Express Fee (Filing): PHP 500
Express Fee (I-Card Processing): PHP 500
TOTAL: PHP PHP 9,720  PLUS:
Additional I-Card Fee US$ 50 converted to PHP at current exchange rate

Approximately 12,000 PHP

However, I have seen converted costs in 2018 at the equivalent of almost 15,000 PHP

Can I stay in the Philippines without a Visa?

How long Can I Stay in the Philippines Without a Visa

A Visitor to the Philippines is normally allowed a 30 day stay without a Visa, otherwise financial penalties apply.

  • Some Nationalities have periods other than 30 days

If you renew the visitors entry visa on time, before it expires within that 30 days, there is no penalty.

On arrival at Philippines Immigration, most people get a 30 day free stay entered on their passport, and this gives the date they MUST leave by, or renew that visa.

If staying longer than 30 days, they would then renew during that 30 days, at a Bureau of Immigration office, for a cost of 3,030 pesos for another 29 days, giving them 59 days in total.

If they wish to stay longer, they renew again, commonly for two months at a time, at a cost of about 4,400 pesos.

They can keep renewing for up to 24 or 36 months, depending on their nationality.

If they do not renew a visa, and therefore become an illegal alien, then they put themselves in the position of facing:

  • Paying the Visa Fees outstanding PLUS
  • Paying Financial Penalties for every month PLUS
  • Possible Blacklisting (not being allowed to enter the Philippines again) PLUS
  • Possible Deportation (this might involve detention and then removal)

Visitors must pay those visa renewal fees, plus penalty charges, before they are allowed into immigration on departure.  (At the time of writing most overstayers must go to a Bureau of Immigration office, not in the airport, and face missing their flight.)

In cases where a visitor has no valid visa when leaving they are often told to leave the airport, and go to a Bureau of Immigration and sort out their visa issues before returning to try to leave again.

At that point they may also be told that they cannot return to the Philippines again, ie: Blacklisted.

Visa Free Entry to Philippines

Guidelines On The Entry Of Temporary Visitors To The Philippines

Nationals from countries listed below who are travelling to the Philippines for business and tourism purposes are allowed to enter the Philippines without visas for a stay not exceeding thirty (30) days, provided they hold valid tickets for their return journey to port of origin or next port of destination and their passports valid for a period of at least six (6) months beyond the contemplated period of stay.

Nationals from the following countries are allowed to enter the Philippines without a visa for a period of stay of thirty (30) days or less:

Andorra
Angola
Antigua and Barbuda
Argentina
Australia
Austria
Bahamas
Bahrain
Barbados
Belgium
Belize
Benin
Bhutan
Bolivia
Botswana
Brazil (59 Days)
Brunei Darussalam
Bulgaria
Burkina Faso
Burundi
Cambodia
Cameroon
Canada
Cape Verde
Central African Republic
Chad
Chile
Colombia
Comoros
Congo
Costa Rica
Cote d’Ivoire
Croatia
Cyprus
Czech Republic
Democratic Republic of the Congo
Denmark
Djibouti
Dominica
Dominican Republic
Ecuador
El Salvador
Equatorial Guinea
Eritrea
Estonia
Ethiopia
Fiji
Finland
France
Gabon
Gambia
Germany
Ghana
Greece
Grenada
Guatemala
Guinea
Guinea Bissau
Guyana
Haiti
Honduras
Hungary
Iceland
Indonesia
Ireland
Israel (59 days)
Italy
Jamaica
Japan
Kazakhstan
Kenya
Kiribati
Kuwait
Kyrgyzstan
Lao People’s Democratic Republic
Latvia
Lesotho
Liberia
Liechtenstein
Lithuania
Luxembourg
Madagascar
Malawi
Malaysia
Maldives
Mali
Malta
Marshall Islands
Mauritania
Mauritius
Mexico
Micronesia
Monaco
Mongolia
Morocco
Mozambique
Myanmar
Namibia
Nepal
Netherlands
New Zealand
Nicaragua
Niger
Norway
Oman
Palau
Panama
Papua New Guinea
Paraguay
Peru
Poland
Portugal
Qatar
Republic of Korea
Romania
Russia
Rwanda
Saint Kitts and Nevis
Saint Lucia
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines
Samoa
San Marino
Sao Tome and Principe
Saudi Arabia
Senegal
Seychelles
Singapore
Slovak Republic
Slovenia
Solomon Islands
South Africa
Spain
Suriname
Swaziland
Sweden
Switzerland
Tajikistan
Thailand
Togo
Trinidad and Tobago
Tunisia
Turkey
Turkmenistan
Tuvalu
Uganda
United Arab Emirates
United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland
United Republic of Tanzania
United States of America
Uruguay
Uzbekistan
Vanuatu
Vatican
Venezuela
Vietnam
Zambia
Zimbabwe

The following are allowed to enter the Philippines without a visa for a stay not exceeding fifty-nine (59) days:

  • Holders of Brazil passports
  • Holders of Israel passports

The following are allowed to enter the Philippines without a visa for a stay not exceeding seven (7) days:

  • Holders of Hong Kong Special Administrative (SAR) passports
  • Holders of British National Overseas (BNO) passports
  • Holders of Portuguese Passports issued in Macao
  • Holders of Macao Special Administrative Region (SAR) passports

Important Note:

Nationals who are subjects of deportation/blacklist orders of the Department and the Bureau of Immigration shall not be admitted to the Philippines.

Balikbayan Visa and Return Air-ticket Requirement

Does a Visitor to the Philippines need a Return Ticket if they are Married to a Philippine Citizen

A Balikbayan Visa holder, is a person who gets a special Passport stamp to allow them to stay in the Philippines, for one year, if they are married to a Philippine Citizen.  They get this stamp on ENTRY into the Philippines, not before.

Most visitors to the Philippines normally need a Return or onward air-ticket before being allowed to fly into the Philippines.  (I have read that the airline faces a $1,000 penalty if a passenger is found to be not holding an onward ticket)

Most airlines will NOT give return tickets up to a one year period.

So, does a Balikbayan Visa holder need a Return Air-ticket ? And if so, how ?

There are many questions on this, on various Internet Forums etc, going back for years, with various different answers.

A quote from the Philippine Consulate states:

Under the Balikbayan Law, a Filipino citizen’s (including dual citizens and former Filipinos) foreign spouse and children are entitled to a visa-free entry to the Philippines and visa-free stay for a period of one (1) year, provided they enter the Philippines with the said Filipino and they have a return air travel ticket.
http://www.philippineconsulate.com.au/dual-citizenship/introduction-note.html

This does appear to be the legal viewpoint.

Yes. You do appear to NEED a return/onward ticket.

Emigration Clearance Certification (ECC) to be available at Airports

Emigration Clearance Certification (ECC) to be available at Airports

Visitor Visa Holders can now get the ECC at the Airport..

IF

a) Is leaving the country within twenty-four (24) hours and with Boarding Pass;
b) Stayed in the Philippines for six (6) months but not more than one (1) year;
c) Is a holder of a valid Temporary Visitor’s Visa (TVV);
d) Has no pending obligation with the Government, its instrumentalities, agencies and subdivisions, and has no pending criminal civil or administrative action which by law requires his presence in the Philippines; and
e) Is registered under the Alien registration Program (ARP) and was issued a Special security Registration Number (SSRN).

The Cost is either 1,210 pesos or 500 pesos depending on if you paid an ECC Fee  with your First Temporary Visitor’s Visa extension.

The official document on this is shown at: www.immigration.gov.ph/…/OOSBM%202015-009.pdf and is copied below:

 

REPUBLIC OF THE PHILIPPINES
DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE
BUREAU OF IMMIGRATION
MAGALLANES DRIVE, INTRAMUROS
1002 MANILA

OPERATIONS ORDER NO. SBM-2015-009

AUTHORITY TO ISSUE EMIGRATION CLEARANCE CERTIFICATE (ECC) AT INTERNATIONAL PORTS OF EXIT

WHEREAS, foreign nationals with Temporary Visitor’s Visa (TVV) who stayed in the country for six (6) months or more are required to secure an Emigration Clearance Certification (ECC) before they are allowed to depart from the Philippines;

WHEREAS, under present regulations, ECCs are only issued at the Bureau of Immigration (BI) Main Office, through the Alien Registration Division (ARD), and Sub-Port Offices; WHEREAS, statistics show that the primary reason for deferred departure of foreign nationals is their failure to secure an ECC prior to their intended departure;

WHEREAS, the incidence of deferred departures of foreign nationals shall substantially decrease if bi offices at the international ports of exit are authorized to issued ECCs and will facilitate their travel;

NOW THEREFORE, pursuant to book IV, Chapter 6, sections 29 and 36(2) of Executive Order No. 292, as amended, otherwise known as the “Administrative Code of 1987”, in relation to Section 3 of Commonwealth Act No. 613, as amended, otherwise known as the “Philippine Immigration Act of 1940”, the following rules are hereby ordered:

Section 1. Issuance of ECC at the International Port of Exit. – An Emigration Clearance Certificate may be issued to a foreign national at the international port of exit who:

a) Is leaving the country within twenty-four (24) hours and with Boarding Pass;
b) Stayed in the Philippines for six (6) months but not more than one (1) year;
c) Is a holder of a valid Temporary Visitor’s Visa (TVV);
d) Has no pending obligation with the Government, its instrumentalities, agencies and subdivisions, and has no pending criminal civil or administrative action which by law requires his presence in the Philippines; and
e) Is registered under the Alien registration Program (ARP) and was issued a Special security Registration Number (SSRN).

Section 2. Duties of the Airport Operations Division (AOD). –

Upon finding that the foreign national qualifies for issuance of ECC under Section 1 hereof, the Airport Operations Division (AOD), through its duly authorized Collecting Officer /Cashier, shall collect from the foreign national the amount of Seven Hundred Ten Pesos (Php 710.00) as ECC Fee and Five Hundred Pesos (Php 500.00) as express Lane Fee; Provided, however, that if the ECC Fee was already paid upon the First TVV extension, only the amount of Five Hundred Pesos (Php 500.00) as Express Lane Fee shall be collected.

Section 3. Deferred Departure. – A foreign national without an ECC and not qualified for issuance thereof pursuant to Section 1 hereof shall not be cleared for departure and shall be referred to the nearest BI Office authorized to process and issue such ECC.

Section 4. Duty of the Immigration Officer. –
the Immigration Officer on primary inspection shall indicate in the Border Control Information System the:
a) Official receipt Number/s covering the fees paid at the international port of exit; or
b) ECC Number issued by the BI Main Office or Sub-Port Offices.

Section 5. Supercession Clause. – All circulars, memoranda, orders and other issuances inconsistent with this Circular are hereby repealed, amended of modified accordingly.

Section 6. Effectivity. – This Order Shall take effect fifteen (15) days after publication in a newspaper of general circulation.

Let a copy of this Order be furnished to the Office of the National Administrative Register (ONAR), U.P. Law Center, University of the Philippines, Diliman, Quezon City. City of Manila, Philippines.
16 April 2015
Signed
SIEGFRED B. MISON
Commissioner

Philippines Immigration – Letter of Invitation

What is an Invitation Letter for Visitors to the Philippines?

Some statements taken from a Philippines Embassy website MAY help to work out if an Invitation Letter is applicable or even appropriate.
However, this information was taken from an Overseas Philippines Embassy and refers to a Filipino in another country inviting a relative to visit from the Philippines to that other country.

What is an Invitation Letter?

A: The Bureau of Immigration requires that this document, in the form of an affidavit of support or guarantee, be authenticated at ….
A: The so-called “invitation letter” is just another affidavit issued by an Embassy.

How to do an Invitation Letter?

A: If you have determined that your relative requires an invitation letter, please come to the Embassy during office hours…. Processing takes two working days, as any other authentication.

Is an Invitation Letter a guarantee of the visitor being accepted?

A: During the application for the “invitation letter” at the Embassy, we always mention at the counter that this document is not a guarantee that the invited party will not be offloaded.
A: The assessment of the Immigration Officer, at the point of entry, is the final decision on whether the preson is allowed in or is turned back.

This page is intended to give a guide to some aspects of the “invitation letter” and is not to be taken as expert opinion in any way.

Indian Nationals entering the Philippines as Tourist

Visa for Indian Tourist into Philippines

A Visa is required before arrival

The visitor must apply for a visa at the Philippine Embassy or Philippine Consulate in the country of legal residence.

HOWEVER:

Effective 20 April 2015, Indian passport holders do not require a visa for tourism travel not exceeding fourteen (14) days provided that they hold a valid visa or permanent residence permit issued by a specified country:

These countries are (as at April 2015)

Australia
Japan
Schengen countries
Singapore
U.K.
U.S.A.

This exemption is currently only valid for arrivals at NAIA airport in Manila.

Philippines Visa for Indian

Letter of Invitation to Philippines

If a Visa is required, then a Letter of Invitation may also be required, at the same time as the Visa is applied for. This must contain several elements such as: Length of Stay, Relationship Details, Purpose of Travel and Finances/Support.

This may be something along the lines of:

Dear Sirs

I have invited xxx to visit me in the Philippines in Month Year, for about xxx weeks [=length of stay].
He has been a friend for xxx amount of time, [=explaining the relationship] and we have discussed meeting each other for a while. [=purpose of travel.]
He has sufficient funds to look after himself, but could stay with my family (=Finances/Support)

My contact details are:

Name
Address
Phone Contact
Email

Who can enter the Philippines without a Visa?

Can I enter the Philippines without a Visitor Visa?

Under Executive Order No. 408, nationals of the countries listed below may enter the Philippines without a visa.

If you are a foreign national from a country with diplomatic ties or bilateral agreement with the Philippines, you are allowed to enter the country without securing an entry visa and will be given an initial stay of thirty (30) days provided that you are a holder of a passport valid for at least six (6) months beyond your contemplated stay in the Philippines and present a return or onward ticket.

Allowed to enter for a period not exceeding 59 days.

Brazil
Israel

Allowed to enter for a period not exceeding 30 days.

Andorra
Angola
Antigua and Barbuda
Argentina
Australia
Austria
Bahamas
Bahrain
Barbados
Belgium
Belize
Benin
Bhutan
Bolivia
Botswana
Brunei
Bulgaria
Burkina Faso
Burundi
Cambodia
Cameroon
Canada
Cape Verde
Central African Republic
Chad
Chile
Colombia
Comoros
Congo
Congo, Democratic Republic
Costa Rica
Cote d’Ivoire
Croatia
Cyprus
Czech Republic
Denmark
Djibouti
Dominica
Dominican Republic
Ecuador
El Salvador
Equatorial Guinea
Eritrea
Estonia
Ethiopia
Fiji
Finland
France
Gabon
Gambia
Germany
Ghana
Greece
Grenada
Guatemala
Guinea
Guinea-Bissau
Guyana
Haiti
Honduras
Hungary
Iceland
Indonesia
Ireland
Italy
Jamaica
Japan
Kazakhstan
Kenya
Kiribati
Korea (ROK)
Kuwait
Kyrgyzstan
Laos
Latvia
Lesotho
Liberia
Liechtenstein
Lithuania
Luxembourg
Madagascar
Malawi
Malaysia
Maldives
Mali
Malta
Marshall Island
Mauritania
Mauritius
Mexico
Micronesia
Monaco
Mongolia
Morocco
Mozambique
Myanmar
Namibia
Nepal
Netherlands
New Zealand
Nicaragua
Niger
Norway
Oman
Palau
Panama
Papua New Guinea
Paraguay
Peru
Poland
Portugal
Qatar
Romania
Russia
Rwanda
Kitts and Nevis
Saint Lucia
Vincent and the Grenadines
Samoa
San Marino
Sao Tome and Principe
Saudi Arabia
Senegal
Seychelles
Singapore
Slovak Republic
Slovenia
Solomon Islands
South Africa
Spain
Suriname
Swaziland
Sweden
Switzerland
Tanzania
Tajikistan
Thailand
Togo
Trinidad and Tobago
Tunisia
Turkey
Turkmenistan
Tuvalu
Uganda
United Arab Emirates
United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland
United States of America
Uruguay
Uzbekistan
Vanuatu
Vatican
Venezuela
Viet Nam
Zambia
Zimbabwe

Source: www.immigration.gov.ph/…/travel-req

Visiting the Philippines as a Tourist

What are the Requirements for visiting the Philippines as a Tourist?

VISA

Most visitors do not need a Visa to enter the Philippines, and will be given a FREE stay of 30 days on entry.  Some countries are excluded from this option though, and need a Visa before they arrive.  www.in-philippines.com/who-can-enter-the-philippines-without-a-visa

If the visitor intends to stay more than 30 days, they MUST get an extension from a Bureau of Immigration Office [BoI] before that 30 days expires.

This first Extension will be given for 29 days, at a cost of 3,030 pesos (as at April 2015)

If staying longer than 59 days, then another extension is needed and an Alien Certificate of Registration [ACR-I Card]

This next extension is often done for 2 months, but can be done for 6 months at the major BoI offices.

The current price for a 1 month extension is quoted as: 4,400 pesos
The current price for a 2 month extension is quoted as: 4,900 pesos
– See: www.in-philippines.com/philippines-visitor-visa-extension-cost
The current price for a 6 month extension is quoted as: 11,500 pesos
– See: www.in-philippines.com/6-month-tourist-visa-for-philippines

The ACR-I card has a cost of US$50 + 500 pesos

Visas for most visitors can be extended up to a maximum of 36 months, before they MUST leave the country.

RETURN TICKET

Most airlines will not allow a traveller to board a plane to the Philippines unless they have an onward ticket to depart the Philippines.

Some people will buy a cheap one way ticket to Hong Kong, or similar, to get around the need to have an expensive return ticket back to their home country if they do not know when they will be returning.

Very rarely though do Philippine Immigration actually check if you do have a return ticket. But.. sometimes they do.

How much are the Penalties for Overstaying as a Tourist in the Philippines?

How much is the Overstaying Fee for Tourists in the Philippines?

Most Tourists to the Philippines are allowed to stay for 30 days before needing to apply for a Visa. The first Tourist Visa extension is the initial extension of twenty-nine (29) days, taking the visit up to 59 days.

This is commonly followed by a two month extension, although some Bureau of Immigration offices allow a 6 month extension.

If a person stay in the Philippines without a Valid Visitor Visa, then penalties are applied, and added to the unpaid Visa fees.

These combined penalties and fees can add up over time and can be something like the following figures:

I have calculated the following approximate costs for overstay payments including Visa Fees, ACR cards and Penalties.

Pesos:
4,310 From One day to One Month Overstay (Updated Sept 2017)
6,000 Total for between One and Two Months Overstay (Updated July 2018)
13,000 Total for Up to Three Month Overstay
15,000 Total for Up to Four Month Overstay
17,000 Total for Up to Five Month Overstay
18,000 Total for Up to Six Months Overstay
20,000 Total for Up to Seven Month Overstay
22,000 Total for Up to Eight Month Overstay
24,000 Total for Up to Nine Month Overstay
26,000 Total for Up to Ten Month Overstay
28,000 Total for Up to Eleven Month Overstay
30,000 Total for Up to Twelve Months Overstay
60,000 Total for Up to Two Years Overstay
90,000 Total for Up to Three Years Overstay
120,000 Total for Up to Four Years Overstay
150,000 Total for Up to Five Years Overstay
180,000 Total for Up to Six Years Overstay
210,000 Total for Up to Seven Years Overstay
240,000 Total for Up to Eight Years Overstay
270,000 Total for Up to Nine Years Overstay
300,000 Total for Up to Ten Years Overstay
450,000 Total for Up to Fifteen Years Overstay

Note: These are approximate costs Immigration will determine the exact cost when you visit their office.

A reasonable ‘estimate’ can be made by calculating 3,000 pesos for every month of Overstay. Or about 30,000 for each year.

These figures are approximate calculations based on 2016 fees. They may reduce the cost if they base it on the actual fees dues for older years, which may be less than the 2016 fees.

Charges can also be higher in some cases, such as one example in the comments below:

Pesos:

79,500 For a 19 months overstay.

Financial Penalties for Visa Overstay in the Philippines:

The minimum penalties appear to be:

  • All Visa Extension Fees not previously paid.
  • Fine for Overstaying – (additional) Php 500.00 per month
  • Motion for Reconsideration for Overstaying – (additional) Php 500.00

I have read that the Overstay fee for just a few days would be about 4,000 pesos.

This would be the 3,030 peso first Visa Extension fee + Overstay Fees.  (2015 fees)

If the Overstay is for over one month, but less than two months, then I would guess that the fee would be closer to 12,000 peso, made up as follows:

3,030 pesos – First Visa Extension fee
7,340 pesos – Next Visa Extension fee plus the ACR-i card fee
1,000 pesos – Fine for Overstaying (2 months)
500 pesos – Motion for Reconsideration for Overstaying

If the Overstay is for just over one year, then I would guess that the fee would be closer to 35,000 peso, PLUS possible DEPORTATION.  The fee would be made up as follows (assume figures for 13 months):

3,030 pesos – First Visa Extension fee
22,490 pesos – Six x 2 month Visa Extension fees plus the ACR-i card fee
6,000 pesos – Fine for Overstaying (12 months)
500 pesos – Motion for Reconsideration for Overstaying
plus maybe one ACR-i card renewal fee

That is my guess, based on the actual costs for Normal Visas last year.  If anyone has paid an Overstay Fee, please give details in the comments box below, showing the date and the fee paid and the total days overstayed.  Thank you.

The Official Statement for Visa Extensions is:

Foreigners admitted under Section 9 (a) of the Philippine Immigration Act (PIA) of 1940, as amended, or Executive Order No. 408, as amended, may extend their authorized stay every two (2) months for a total stay of not more than:
– a) Twenty-four (24) months for visa-required nationals; and
– b) Thirty-six (36) months for non-visa required nationals.

The said periods shall be counted from the date of applicant’s latest recorded arrival.

Overstaying Foreigners in the Philippines

Foreigners who have overstayed for twelve (12) months or less but have been in the country beyond the maximum allowable period already may be permitted to update their stay with order to leave the country within fifteen (15) calendar days therefrom and their names may be included in the Bureau’s blacklist upon the discretion of the Commissioner; Provided that, the Commissioner, in the exercise of sound judgment, may allow such foreigners to update and extend their stay taking into consideration their Filipino lineage, medical condition, minority and other analogous circumstances.

Foreigners who have overstayed for more than twelve (12) months regardless if their stay is within the maximum allowable period or those found to be overstaying by virtue to a complaint or Mission Order regardless of the period shall be referred for deportation.

Sourced from: www.immigration.gov.ph/…/234-honorable-secretary

More stories on the Exit Clearance Certificate at:

Extension of Authorized Stay of Temporary Visitors

Extension of Authorized Stay of Temporary Visitors to the Philippines

Tourist Visa holder can stay in the Philippines for either 24 or 36 months without leaving the country according to Immigration Memorandum Circular No. SBM 2013-003 issued on 23 December 2013.

Foreigners admitted under Section 9 (a) of the Philippine Immigration Act (PIA) of 1940, as amended, or Executive Order No. 408, as amended, may extend their authorized stay every two (2) months for a total stay of not more than:
a) Twenty-four (24) months for visa-required nationals; and
b) Thirty-six (36) months for non-visa required nationals.
The said periods shall be counted from the date of applicant’s latest recorded arrival.

A Long Stay Visitor Visa Extension is now available where the total duration of extension shall be not more than six (6) months from the time of expiration of authorized stay.

Offices of the Philippines Bureau of Immigration that are authorised to do Extension of Authorized Stay of Temporary Visitors

Sourced from www.immigration.gov.ph at May 2015.

  • Intramuros, Manila Main Office
  • Makati, Manila Immigration Extension Office
  • Angeles Immigration Field Office
  • Aparri Immigration Field Office
  • Bacolod Immigration Field Office
  • Baguio Immigration District Office
  • Balanga Immigration Field Office
  • Batangas Immigration Field Office
  • Bislig Immigration Field Office
  • Boac Immigration Field Office
  • Bongao Immigration Field Office
  • Boracay Immigration Field Office
  • Butuan Immigration District Office
  • Calapan Immigration District Office
  • Calbayog Immigration Field Office
  • Cagayan de Oro Immigration District Office
  • Cauayan Immigration Field Office
  • Cebu Immigration District Office
  • Cebu Gaisano  Immigration Satellite Office
  • Cotabato Immigration District Office
  • Dagupan Immigration Field Office
  • Davao Immigration District Office
  • Dumaguete Immigration District Office
  • General Santos Immigration Field Office
  • Glan Immigration Field Office
  • Iligan Immigration Field Office
  • Iloilo Immigration District Office
  • Jolo Immigration Field Office
  • Kalibo Immigration Field Office
  • Laoag Field Immigration Office
  • Legaspi Immigration District Office
  • Lucena Immigration Field Office
  • Naga Immigration Field Office
  • Olongapo Immigration Field Office
  • Ozamis Immigration Field Office
  • Puerto Princesa Immigration Field Office
  • San Fernando Immigration District Office
  • SM North Immigration Satellite Office
  • Sta. Rosa Immigration Field Office
  • Surigao Immigration Field Office
  • Tacloban Immigration District Office
  • Tagbilaran Immigration Field Office
  • Taytay Immigration Field Office
  • Tuguegarao Immigration District Office
  • Zamboanga Immigration Field Office

Updated as of 22 May 2014

Information from Bureau of Immigration FAQ’s

I am a foreign national under a Temporary Visitor’s Visa, I can stay legally in the Philippines for thirty (30) days however I want to extend my stay, how do I go about this?

Foreign nationals who are admitted with an initial stay of thirty (30) days may apply for a visa waiver first, granting an additional stay of twenty nine (29) in the Philippines. Thereafter, you may apply for one (1) month, two (2) months or six (6) months extensions at least one week prior to the expiration of your valid stay.

How long can I extend my in the Philippines?

Under Immigration Memorandum Circular No. SBM-2013-003, non-visa required national may extend their stay up to thirty six (36) months while visa required national may extend their stay up to twenty four (24) months.
Note: The said periods shall be counted from the date of the applicant’s latest recorded arrival.

http://immigration.gov.ph/faqs/extensionofstay

Philippines Visitor Visa Extension Cost

How Much is a Visa to enter the Philippines as a Tourist

Visitors from most countries are allowed to enter the Philippines Visa Free for 30 days, but if staying longer, then they must get an extension from the Bureau of Immigration.

The cost for this is 3,030 pesos, as shown at www.immigration.gov.ph/…/visa-waiver. Last checked November 2019.

These figures are for Non-Visa Required Nationals.

Fees for the subsequent Visa Extensions are quoted as:

4,400 pesos One Month
4,900 pesos Two Months

A Tourist ACR I-Card is also required after the first 59 days stay, and this has a cost of US$50 + 500 pesos., and is valid for one year.

www.immigration.gov.ph/…/extension-of-authorized-stay-beyond-59-days

Those Visitors wishing to extend for 6 months can do so, at some BoI offices, for the current quoted price of 11,500 pesos.

http://www.immigration.gov.ph//long-stay-visitor-visa-extension-lsvve

One or Two Month Visa Extension Costs

Philippines Visa Charge after 59 days

One Year Tourist Visa for Philippines

Is there a 12 month Tourist Visa for the Philippines

There are a number of Philippines Embassies around the world that offer a 3, 6 or 12 month Tourist Visa for the Philippines, but, is it what you first think?

This is copied from the Philippine Embassy in Norway which covers Filipinos in Norway, Denmark, Finland, Iceland and Sweden.

C. Below are different types of Entry Visas for Tourists and their respective fees:

Single ENTRY valid for three (3) months (270 Norwegian Kroner or 1,492 Php 14/4/2015);
Multiple ENTRY valid for six (6) months (540 Norwegian Kroner or 2,984 Php 14/4/2015); and
Multiple ENTRY valid for one (1) year (810 Norwegian Kroner or 4,420 Php 14/4/2015)

D. The above-mentioned visas are for ENTRY purposes only. Period of stay (which will not exceed 59 days) will be determined by the immigration officer at the point of entry in the Philippines.

Take special note of the item D: Each Period of stay will not exceed 59 days. You NEED to leave the Philippines before the 60th day, or apply for and get, a normal Visa Extension before the 59th day expires.

This is copied from the Philippine Consulate Los Angeles, USA.

The applicable fees for a tourist visa are as follows:

Single entry valid for three (3) months: US$30.00  (or 1,340 Php 14/4/2015)
Multiple entry valid for (6) months US$60.00  (or 2,680 Php 14/4/2015)
Multiple entry valid for twelve (12) months $90.00  (or 4,019 Php 14/4/2015)

NOTE: The authorized maximum period of stay granted by the Philippine Consulate to all temporary visitor’s visa applicants is fifty-nine (59) days. If the applicant will stay beyond 59 days in the Philippines, an application for extension of stay must be filed at the Bureau of Immigration in Manila, or the Immigration office nearest to the place where the applicant is temporarily residing.

Balikbayan 12 Month Visa

The Balikbayan Program allows visa-free entry to the Philippines for a period of one (1) year for foreign passport holders, with the exception of restricted nationals.

This normally applies to a foreign spouse of a Filipino citizen who ARRIVES with the Filipino spouse, and effectively gets a 12 month visa at the airport. This allows the holder to stay for the full 12 months, before needing to leave OR apply for another type of visa.

The term “balikbayan” shall mean a Filipino citizen who has been continuously out of the Philippines for a period of at least one (1) year, a Filipino overseas worker, or a former Filipino citizen and his or her family who had been naturalized in a foreign country and comes or returns to the Philippines.

The term “family” shall mean the spouse and the children of the balikbayan traveling with the latter to the Philippines.

6 Month Tourist Visa for Philippines

6 Month Visa or Long Stay Visa for Visitors

Those two terms are actually the same thing, but many people think they can apply for this before entering the Philippines. They can’t.

This 6 month visa is an extension visa only, and the visitor MUST have already renewed the initial 30 day to have stayed for 59 days before applying for the 6 month visa extension.

The COST of a 6 month visa extension.

This is a subject that gets many answers, and many of them are different answers.

The OFFICIAL cost is:  11,500 pesos.

My cost, when I got my Six month Visa Extension in April 2015 was 8,250 pesos.

The price I was quoted by Visa Agencies in my area varied between 16,000 and 18,000 pesos, and their charges for doing it for me ranged between 2,000 and 2,500 pesos (included in the previous figure.)

NOTE: These figures are for Non Visa Required Nationals. ie: People who are allowed to get a visa on arrival at the airport etc in the Philippines.

Why was mine cheaper?

I already had an ACR-I card, saving of 2,600 pesos

So that should be down to 8,900 pesos.  still a difference of 650 pesos.

So there are still a few other differences:

The application was 900 and not 910
The certificate fee was 500 and not 510
The Extension fees came to 3,000 and not 3,010
The ECC was 700 not 710

Here is a breakdown of expected costs and actual costs:

Stated Cost Cost breakdown My Cost
PHP 3,010 Monthly Extension Fee PHP 3,000
PHP 910 Monthly Extension Application Fee PHP 900
PHP 1,010 ACR Re-issuance PHP 250
PHP 250 Head Tax PHP 250
PHP 710 Emigration Clearance Certificate PHP 700
PHP 510 Certificate Fee PHP 500
PHP 2,100 I-Card
PHP 1,500 Express Lane Fee PHP 1,500
PHP 1,000 Express Lane Fee(Certification) PHP 1,000
PHP 500 Express Lane Fee (ACR-I card)
Legal Research Fee PHP 50
Visa Sticker Fee PHP 100
PHP 11,500 TOTAL PHP 8,250

 

Actual Cost Quoted in April 2015:

Visa Cost 6 months

Registration for Visitors to Philippines after 59 days

Special Security Registration for Visitors to Philippines

In October 2014 the Immigration department of the Philippines Government created a new policy with the Alien Registration Project (ARP), and the need for a Special Security Registration Number (SSRN).

This very simple means that almost anyone staying over 59 days needs to register with Photo and Fingerprints and about 700 pesos, at almost any Immigration Office in the country.  A personal appearance is required.  You must be dressed in Trousers and Shoes at most offices.  It is NOT possible for a Travel Agent or Visa assistance agent to do this for you,

If you also need an ACR card, then this will be a further 500 pesos + US$50 or US$20 for an ACR-I card renewal.

It also appears that you must also have a mailing address for the sending of the SSRN certificate.

Those visitors who stay over 59 days will now need both the ACR-I card (Photo only) and the SSRN (Photo and Fingerprints).

One report stated: “Foreign nationals who have valid alien registration cards or I-Cards are exempted from the program.  However, the official site states: “Those valid ACR-I-Cards (Except for Tourist ACR-I cards) are exempted from the program.

 

ARP announcement2

Alien Registration Project  2015

The ARP shall be held from 01 October 2014 until 30 September 2015. Aliens may apply at any authorized BI Regional Office

1. Bring a duly filled-out ARP form (form and additional information is available at www.immigration.gov.ph) and any valid identification (e.g. passport, driver’s license).

Registered aliens under this program may be primary beneficiaries of future social integration/legalization programs of the government.

www.immigration.gov.ph

 

Tourist Visa Holders can stay for 3 years in Philippines

How long can a Tourist Visa Holder extend a visa for in the Philippines?

The answer is either 24 months or 36 months depending on the country you come from.

Information from www.immigration.gov.ph states:

Under Immigration Memorandum Circular No. SBM-2013-003, non-visa required national may extend their stay up to thirty six (36) months while visa required national may extend their stay up to twenty four (24) months.

 

Immigration Memorandum Circular No. SBM 2013-003

23 December 2013

Services
Honorable Secretary of Justice (SOJ) Leila M. de Lima approved Immigration Memorandum Circular No. SBM 2013-003 on 23 December 2013 which was recommended by Bureau of Immigration (BI) Commissioner Siegfred B. Mison. Said issuance provides for the policies and guidelines on the extension and updating of temporary visitor’s visa (TVV).

Allowable Extensions

Foreigners admitted under Section 9 (a) of the Philippine Immigration Act (PIA) of 1940, as amended, or Executive Order No. 408, as amended, may extend their authorized stay every two (2) months for a total stay of not more than:
a) Twenty-four (24) months for visa-required nationals; and
b) Thirty-six (36) months for non-visa required nationals.

The said periods shall be counted from the date of applicant’s latest recorded arrival.

Foreigners with Derogatory Records

Foreigners included in the Bureau’s derogatory list shall be allowed to extend/ update their authorized stay as temporary visitors; Provided that, their inclusion in the derogatory list is not on the ground of having overstayed in the country.

Restrictions on Extension/Updating

The following applications for extension/ updating, accompanied by a sworn written explanation stating valid grounds and/or justifications with supporting documents, shall require the approval of the Commissioner:
a) Extensions of stay beyond the maximum allowable stay prescribed in Section 2 hereof; and
b) Foreigners who have overstayed for more than six (6) months but not exceeding twelve (12) months regardless if their stay is within the maximum allowable period.

Acquisition of Appropriate Visa/Permit

Foreigners may be granted an extension beyond the maximum allowable period provided that they shall secure appropriate visas/ permits during such extension and have not overstayed in any given period.

Overstaying Foreigners

Foreigners who have overstayed for twelve (12) months or less but have been in the country beyond the maximum allowable period already may be permitted to update their stay with order to leave the country within fifteen (15) calendar days therefrom and their names may be included in the Bureau’s blacklist upon the discretion of the Commissioner; Provided that, the Commissioner, in the exercise of sound judgment, may allow such foreigners to update and extend their stay taking into consideration their Filipino lineage, medical condition, minority and other analogous circumstances.

Foreigners who have overstayed for more than twelve (12) months regardless if their stay is within the maximum allowable period or those found to be overstaying by virtue to a complaint or Mission Order regardless of the period shall be referred for deportation.

Payment

In addition to the extension/ updating fees and other charges, the concerned foreigners shall be required to pay all immigration arrears imposed by Republic Act No. 562, as amended.

Requirements for an ECC – Exit Clearance Certificate

Requirements for an ECC

The Philippines Bureau of Immigration (BI) has stated that the following are needed to get an ECC – Exit Clearance Certificate (also called Emigration Clearance Certificate)

  • Completed application forms. (They supply numerous forms for you to fill in !!)
  • 6 pcs. colored photo (size 2×2 ) white background. (NOTE: SIX were needed, not the FIVE that web sites say.
  • Photocopy of passport (3 Pages: biopage, latest arrival stamp and last visa extension stamp).
  • Photo of both sides of Alien Certificate of Registration ACR card. (Must be Current NOT Expired)
  • Photocopy AND Original of the Receipt for payment of last visa extension fees. (To be issued with an ECC, you need up to date valid visas)
  • Current ACR-I card
  • A personal appearance is required for fingerprinting, both electronic scanning and manual ink, and photograph.

There are various forms available for download at: http://immigration.gov.ph/index.php/downloads/application-forms but… not for the Emigration Clearance Certificate (ECC) as it is now called.

Philippines BI Forms

More Information on the Exit Clearance Certificate

Who needs an ECC Emigration Clearance Certificate or Exit Clearance Certificate

An Emigration Clearance Certificate [ECC] is needed when Foreign Passport Holders are leaving the Philippines after a stay of 6 months or more.

Your passport may be stamped like this, when you get a visa renewal that takes you past 6 months after entry.

Notice of ECC after 6 months

Any child, born in the Philippines, but travelling on a Foreign passport, NEEDS an ECC to leave the Philippines. A notice to this effect is on display at a Bureau of Immigration office.

Requirements for an Emigration Clearance Certificate [ECC]

To be issued with an ECC, you need up to date valid visas, and an ACR-I card.

Cost of an ECC Emigration Clearance Certificate or Exit Clearance Certificate

Cost of ECC-A

The cost for an ECC-A in 2014 was 500 pesos.  There has been some recent talk about it being free, by some people, but two recent comments shown below, show that there is still a charge being made.

  1. ken hogan on January 17, 2018 at 12:52 pm
    i just got my ECC today 17/1/ 2018 at J Mall Mandaue 500 php total
  2. Edward on November 2, 2017 at 5:15 pm
    I just got my ECC and the total cost was 710 pesos at the J centre mall on the second floor in mandaue

Cost of ECC-B

The cost for an ECC-B in 2015 was mentioned by one person at 2,850 pesos. The cost was mentioned again in October 2018.

  1. Friendly Citizen on October 30, 2018  at 5:37 am
    I paid 2,860 + 500 (express fee) = 3,360.

ECC-A for Visitor Visa Holders

The ECC-A may be secured at the BI Main Office or in select District Offices, Satellite Offices, Field Offices, One-Stop-Shops.
ECC-A is issued to departing holders of Tourist Visas who have stayed for 6 months or more. A valid ACR-i card is required for this when the Visitor visa holder has been in the country for over 2 months.
ECC-A is issued to departing holders of Immigrant and Non-Immigrant visas with valid ACR I-Cards and are leaving the country permanently.

ECC-B for other Than Visitor Visa Holders

The ECC-B may be secured at the BI Main Office or in the airport upon departure.
ECC-B is issued to departing holders of Immigrant and Non-Immigrant visas with valid ACR I-Cards and are leaving the country temporarily.

Update:

Confusion between ECC-A and ECC-B for Tourist Visa Holders

There is confusion on whether a Tourist Visa holder, leaving the country temporarily, and holding an ACR-I card, requires the ECC-A or the ECC-B.

Tourist Visa in the country over 6 months: ECC-A with no confusion. (ECC-A is issued to departing holders of Tourist Visas who have stayed for 6 months or more)

Tourist Visa in the country under 6 months: This is where the confusion arises, as the Tourist Visa holder must also have an ACR-I card (after 2 months) and the rules state: ECC-B is issued to departing holders of Immigrant and Non-Immigrant visas with valid ACR I-Cards and are leaving the country temporarily

However, even if the Tourist Visa holder is only leaving temporarily, their visa will normally expire on leaving, meaning it is a permanent exit on that visa, and they will return on a new visa, automatically given for most nationals, for a 30 day period, with the same conditions applying for a new temporary visa entry.

If the Immigrant or Non-Immigrant visa can be used for re-entry, then it could be classed as ‘leaving the country temporarily’, and selecting the ECC-B.

It is possible that some Tourist Visas may be able to be used for re-entry under those circumstances.

 

When the ECC was enforced in 2013, the reason for this certificate was given as follows:

Immigration Commissioner Siegfred Mison said that the ECC is being issued to departing foreigner nationals to prove that they have no derogatory records in the country or any accountability with other government agencies.

There are two types of ECC:

The ECC-A is being issued to foreigners who have tourist visas extending for more than six months. (A tourist visa holder in the country for over two months will also have a tourist ACR-i card)

The ECC-B, on the other hand, is given to holders of immigrant and non-immigrant visas with valid alien certificate registration I-Cards.